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ID 116294
Author
Sogabe, Masahiro Tokushima University|Shikoku Central Hospital of the Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Okahisa, Toshiya Tokushima University|Shikoku Central Hospital of the Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Kurihara, Takeshi Shikoku Central Hospital of the Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers
Kagawa, Miwako Shikoku Central Hospital of the Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers
Kagemoto, Kaizo Tokushima University
Nakasono, Masahiko Tsurugi Municipal Handa Hospital
Keywords
metabolic syndrome
erosive esophagitis
metabolite analysis
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Background: Erosive esophagitis (EE) is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome (MS), but is not always recognized in individuals with MS and the prevalence of EE in individuals with non-MS is not low.
Aim: To examine the differences in clinical factors associated with EE at various stages of MS, as well as the differences in metabolites between subjects with MS, with and without EE.
Methods: A total of 7,097 persons who underwent health checkups including esophagogastroduodenoscopy were analyzed. We examined the differences in clinical factors for EE among subjects with non-MS, pre-MS, and MS and compared metabolites between 34 subjects with MS, with and without EE.
Results: EE prevalence was significantly higher in the MS and pre-MS groups than in the non-MS group (p < 0.001). EE severity was higher in the MS group than in the pre-MS and non-MS groups (p < 0.001). In the non-MS group, there were significant differences between subjects with and without EE with respect to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and smoking. In the pre-MS and MS groups, there were significant differences in H. pylori, hiatal hernia, and drinking in those with and without EE. The levels of glutamine, hypoxanthine, and lactic acid metabolites were significantly different between subjects with MS, with and without EE (all p < 0.05).
Conclusion: Although H. pylori and lifestyle factors such as smoking and drinking are important for EE, differences in these factors should be considered at various stages of MS. Additionally, several metabolites may be involved in the development of EE in MS.
Journal Title
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy
ISSN
11787007
Publisher
Dove Medical Press
Volume
14
Start Page
1589
End Page
1600
Published Date
2021-04-12
Rights
This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms. php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms (https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).
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language
eng
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departments
Medical Sciences
University Hospital