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ID 115057
Title Alternative
Progression to In-Hospital Ischemic Stroke
Author
Korai, Masaaki Tokushima University
Shikata, Eiji Tokushima University
Yamaguchi, Tadashi Tokushima University
Yamamoto, Yuki Tokushima University
Kitazato, Keiko T. Tokushima University
Okayama, Yoshihiro Tokushima University
Keywords
In-hospital stroke
Cancer
D-dimer
Fibrinogen
Hypercoagulability
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Background and Purpose: Little attention has been paid to the pathogenesis of in-hospital stroke, despite poor outcomes and a longer time from stroke onset to treatment. We studied the pathophysiology and biomarkers for detecting patients who progress to in-hospital ischemic stroke (IHS). Methods: Seventy-nine patients with IHS were sequentially recruited in the period 2011–2017. Their characteristics, care, and outcomes were compared with 933 patients who had an out-of-hospital ischemic stroke (OHS) using a prospectively collected database of the Tokushima University Stroke Registry. Results: Active cancer and coronary artery disease were more prevalent in patients with IHS than in those with OHS (53.2 and 27.8% vs. 2.0 and 10.9%, respectively; p < 0.001), the median onset-to-evaluation time was longer (300 vs. 240 min; p = 0.015), and the undetermined etiology was significantly higher (36.7 vs. 2.4%; p < 0.001). Although there was no significant difference in stroke severity at onset between the groups, patients with IHS had higher modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores (3–6) at discharge (67.1 vs. 50.3%; p = 0.004) and rates of death during hospitalization (16.5 vs. 2.9%; p < 0.001). D-dimer (5.8 vs. 0.8 µg/mL; p < 0.001) and fibrinogen (532 vs. 430 mg/dL; p = 0.014) plasma levels at the time of onset were significantly higher in patients with IHS after propensity score matching. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that active cancer (odds ratio [OR] 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26–4.20), prestroke mRS scores 3–5 (OR 6.78; 95% CI 3.96–11.61), female sex (OR 1.57; 95% CI 1.19–2.08), and age ≥75 years (OR 2.36; 95% CI 1.80–3.08) were associated with poor outcomes. Conclusions: Patients with IHS had poorer outcomes than those with OHS because of a higher prevalence of active cancer and functional dependence before stroke onset. Elevated plasma levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen, especially with active cancer, can help identify patients who are at a higher risk of progression to IHS.
Journal Title
Cerebrovascular Diseases Extra
ISSN
16645456
Publisher
Karger
Volume
9
Issue
3
Start Page
129
End Page
138
Published Date
2019-11-22
Rights
This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND) (http://www.karger.com/Services/OpenAccessLicense). Usage and distribution for commercial purposes as well as any distribution of modified material requires written permission.
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language
eng
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departments
University Hospital
Medical Sciences