ID 106362
Author
Nishiike, Suetaka Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka Rosai Hospital
Okazaki, Suzuyo Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
Watanabe, Hiroshi Institute for Human Science and Biomedical Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Akizuki, Hironori Department of Otolaryngology, University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Imai, Takao Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
Uno, Atsuhiko Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
Kitahara, Tadashi Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
Horii, Arata Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
Takeda, Noriaki Department of Otolaryngology, University of Tokushima School of Medicine Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Inohara, Hidenori Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
Keywords
virtual reality
visual-vestibulosomatosensory conflict
motion sickness
visual dependency on postural control
sensory re-weighting
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
In this study, we examined the effects of sensory inputs of visual-vestibulosomatosensory conflict induced by virtual reality (VR) on subjective dizziness, posture stability and visual dependency on postural control in humans. Eleven healthy young volunteers were immersed in two different VR conditions. In the control condition, subjects walked voluntarily with the background images of interactive computer graphics proportionally synchronized to their walking pace. In the visual-vestibulosomatosensory conflict condition, subjects kept still, but the background images that subjects experienced in the control condition were presented. The scores of both Graybiel’s and Hamilton’s criteria, postural instability and Romberg ratio were measured before and after the two conditions. After immersion in the conflict condition, both subjective dizziness and objective postural instability were significantly increased, and Romberg ratio, an index of the visual dependency on postural control, was slightly decreased. These findings suggest that sensory inputs of visual-vestibulosomatosensory conflict induced by VR induced motion sickness, resulting in subjective dizziness and postural instability. They also suggest that adaptation to the conflict condition decreases the contribution of visual inputs to postural control with re-weighing of vestibulosomatosensory inputs. VR may be used as a rehabilitation tool for dizzy patients by its ability to induce sensory re-weighing of postural control.
Journal Title
The journal of medical investigation : JMI
ISSN
13431420
NCID
AA11166929
Volume
60
Issue
3-4
Start Page
236
End Page
239
Sort Key
236
Published Date
2013-08
EDB ID
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences