ID 109562
Author
Egawa, Hiroshi Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima KAKEN Search Researchers
Takahashi, Mitsuhiko Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima KAKEN Search Researchers
Higashino, Kosaku Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima KAKEN Search Researchers
Suzue, Naoto Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima KAKEN Search Researchers
Goda, Yuichiro Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima
Sato, Ryosuke Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima KAKEN Search Researchers
Kondo, Kenji Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima
Tezuka, Fumitake Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory
Mineta, Kazuaki Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima
Sugiura, Kosuke Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima
Takeuchi, Makoto Department of Orthopedics, the University of Tokushima
Keywords
elbow arthroscopy
osteochondritis dissecans
capitellum
baseball
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Elbow arthroscopy has become a safe and effective treatment option for a number of elbow disorders. The most rewarding and successful indication is the removal of loose bodies. Loose bodies are often a result of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum, and arthroscopy in this case is useful for performing debridement, thereby eliminating the need for a more extensive open procedure associated with complications. In this review, we describe our arthroscopic technique for OCD of the capitellum. We usually conduct arthroscopy in the supine position, and use 2.9-mm arthroscopes of 30°and 70°. The 70°arthroscope provides a greater operative field than the 30°arthroscope. Arthroscopic treatment for OCD may require 2 anterior and 2 posterior portals. Loose bodies are commonly found in the radial fossa, coronoid fossa, and in the olecranon fossa. Once the loose bodies are removed, all unstable cartilage of the capitellum lesion is removed to create a stable bed. If any sclerotic changes to the lesion bed are observed, we create microfractures in the lesion bed. The most significant complication in arthroplasty is neurovascular injury. However, we have never experienced this devastating complication, which can be avoided by paying careful attention to detail.
Journal Title
The journal of medical investigation : JMI
ISSN
13431420
NCID
AA11166929
Volume
61
Issue
3-4
Start Page
233
End Page
240
Sort Key
233
Published Date
2014-08
EDB ID
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences
University Hospital