ID 109585
Author
Ishida, Soshi Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory
Hashimoto, Ichiro Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Seike, Takuya Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School KAKEN Search Researchers
Abe, Yoshiro Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Nakaya, Yutaka Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima, Graduate School Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Nakanishi, Hideki Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Keywords
serum albumin
nutritional status
burn injury
C-reactive protein
inflammation
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
The aim of this retrospective study was to examine whether serum albumin levels offer a good marker of nutritional status in patients with burns. Serum albumin levels have been used to evaluate nutritional status in burns patients, even though these levels are affected by various factors and are not specific to malnutrition. To clarify whether provision of nutrition or presence of inflammation affects serum albumin levels, we studied serum albumin levels, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and caloric intake over time in 30 patients with burns. Serum albumin levels did not respond to provision of nutrition, but correlated negatively with CRP levels, suggesting that serum albumin levels are more closely associated with inflammation than nutrition. This study also suggests that hypoalbuminemia is a good indicator of the severity of burns or associated complications. We conclude that serum albumin levels do not offer a good nutritional marker in burns patients.
Journal Title
The journal of medical investigation : JMI
ISSN
13431420
NCID
AA11166929
Volume
61
Issue
3-4
Start Page
361
End Page
368
Sort Key
361
Published Date
2014-08
EDB ID
DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences