ID 109914
Title Transcription
スポーツ センシュ ノ ヨウツウ ト テイシンシュウ シュジュツ : ナゾ ノ ヨウツウ オ トキアカス
Title Alternative
Sports Related Lumbar Spine Disorders and Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Surgery
Author
Sairyo, Koichi Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Keywords
atheltes
low back pain
endoscopic surgery
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Low back pain is commonly occurred among athletes. There are some pathologies causing the pain, and most of the pathology would be based on the overuse of the spine during the sports performance. Thus, the clue to obtain the exact diagnosis of the back pain is the lumbar motion causing the pain. Roughly, the pathology is classified into two ; i.e., flexion pain and extension pain. In flexion, anterior component of the spine such as intervertebral disc and endplate is loaded. Thus, disorders causing flexion pain would be disc herniation, discogenic pain, type 1 Modic endplate inflammation and so on. During the lumbar extension motion, posterior element including the facet joints and lamina is loaded. Based on this phenomenon, the lumbar spondylolysis and facet joint arthritis would be the main pathology causing the extension pain. Once the exact diagnosis can be obtained, pin-point intervention is possible including the block therapy and endoscopic surgery. The state of the art minimally invasive disc surgery is the endoscopic surgery. The technique is called the percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (PED). It only requires 8 mm for the skin incision, and it can be done under the local anesthesia. With utilizing the PED system, we have been treating the athletes with disc herniation and discogenic pain minimally invasively.
Journal Title
四国医学雑誌
ISSN
00373699
NCID
AN00102041
Publisher
徳島医学会
Volume
71
Issue
1-2
Start Page
9
End Page
16
Sort Key
9
Published Date
2015-04-25
EDB ID
FullText File
language
jpn
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences