ID 110062
Title Transcription
トラウマ ニ カンレン スル ハンスウ ト シンニュウ シコウ ノ カンレン オヨビ デキゴト カラ ノ キョリカ オ ソクシン スル ヨウ コウゾウカ サレタ ヒッキ ノ コウカ ノ ケントウ
Title Alternative
Studies on the relationship between the trauma-related rumination and the intrusive thinking, and effects of the structured disclosure to facilitate distancing from the event
Author
Matsuda, Ikuo Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology Studies, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Science, The University of Tokushima in 2012
Yuasa, Akari Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology Studies, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Science, The University of Tokushima in 2014
Yashiro, Rio Bachelor's degree in faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Tokushima University in 2012
Shiota, Shoichi Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University
Oguchi, Mika Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology Studies, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Science, The University of Tokushima in 2012
Sato, Kenji Institute of Socio-Arts and Sciences, The Tokushima University Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Keywords
trauma
rumination
structured disclosure
Content Type
Departmental Bulletin Paper
Description
The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between trauma-related rumination and intrusive thinking, and the effects of structured disclosure to facilitate distancing from the event on the trauma-related rumination, posttraumatic stress reactions (PTSR). In Study I, 38 undergraduates who maintain 9 or more scores of Impact of Event Scale (IES) for one month responded broad-trauma related rumination scale (BTRRS) and IES two times. Regression analysis revealed that there was association with the scores on changes of both factors of BTRRS (broad trauma-related rumination and degree of distancing from the broad trauma) and the scores on changes of intrusion factor of IES(R2=.162,p=.007;R2=.253,p=.001). In Study II, participants in the Study I were randomly assigned into three groups: the structured disclosure group(n=8), the free disclosure group(n=7) and the control group(n=8). The structured disclosure group was asked to write the event to facilitate distancing from it. In particular, they wrote the event, and after that wrote it again from the other person's perspective. The free disclosure group wrote the event and the event-related emotion freely. The control group wrote their behavior on the day before and before experiment, and the plan after experiment without emotion. Results showed that the structured disclosure increased short-term distancing more than other groups, but did not increase long-term one and decrease the rumination. Although all participants in groups decreased PTSR and the distress about the event after one month of disclosure, the differences on groups were not significant. Results of this study were discussed from the theoretical standpoints.
Journal Title
徳島大学人間科学研究
ISSN
21873968
NCID
AA12675043
Volume
23
Start Page
19
End Page
38
Sort Key
19
Published Date
2015
FullText File
language
jpn
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Integrated Arts and Sciences