ID 110697
Author
Komatsu, Tatsushi Department of Applied Nutrition, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Nakamori, Masayo Department of Applied Nutrition, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Komatsu, Keiko School of Social Health, Fukuoka Prefecture University
Hosoda, Kazuaki Suntory Research Center
Okamura, Mariko School of Social Health, Fukuoka Prefecture University
Toyama, Kenji School of Food and Nutrition, Seinan Junior College
Ishikura, Yoshiyuki Suntory Research Center
Sakai, Tohru Department of Applied Nutrition, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Kunii, Daisuke Department of Applied Nutrition, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Yamamoto, Shigeru Department of Applied Nutrition, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory
Keywords
oolong tea
green tea
energy expenditure
women
catechin
polyphenols
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Oolong tea is a traditional Chinese tea that has long been believed to be beneficial to health such as decreasing body fat. We were interested in this assertion and tried to evaluate the effect of oolong tea on energy expenditure (EE) in comparison with green tea. The subjects were eleven healthy Japanese females (age 20±1 y body mass index(BMI) 21.2±2.5kg/m2)who each consumed of three treatments in a crossover design : 1) water, 2) oolong tea, 3) green tea. Resting energy expenditure (REE) and EE after the consumption of the test beverage for 120 min were measured using an indirect calorimeter. The cumulative increases of EE for 120 min were significantly increased 10% and 4% after the consumption of oolong tea and green tea, respectively. EE at 60 and 90 min were significantly higher after the consumption of oolong tea than that of water (Plt0.05). In comparison with green tea, oolong tea contained approximately half the caffeine and epigallocatechin galate, while polymerized polyphenols were double. These results suggest that oolong tea increases EE by its polymerized polyphenols.
Journal Title
The journal of medical investigation : JMI
ISSN
13431420
NCID
AA11166929
Volume
50
Issue
3-4
Start Page
170
End Page
175
Sort Key
170
Published Date
2003
EDB ID
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences