ID 110713
Author
Hagiwara, Mari Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima
Kataoka, Keiko Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Arimochi, Hideki Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Kuwahara, Tomomi Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima
Ohnishi, Yoshinari Department of Molecular Bacteriology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory
Keywords
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
ulcer formation
lipopolysaccharide (LPS)
Escherichia coli
myeloperoxidase (MPO)
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induced formation of intestinal ulcers as side effects, in which an unbalanced increase in the number of Gram-negative bacteria in the small intestine plays an important role. To clarify how intestinal microflora are influenced by NSAIDs, we examined the effects of 5-bromo-2-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-methylsulfonylphenyl) thiophene (BFMeT), an NSAID, on intestinal motility and on the growth of Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Transit index, a marker of peristalsis, was not different in BFMeT-treated and solvent-treated rats, indicating that BFMeT increased the number of Gram-negative bacteria without suppression of peristalsis. The factors that affect the growth of intestinal bacteria were not found in intestinal contents of BFMeT-treated rats, because the growth of E. coli and that of L. acidophilus in the supernatants of small intestinal contents of BFMeT-treated rats and solvent-treated rats were not different. The mechanism of the increase in the number of Gram-negative bacteria is still unclear, but heat-killed E. coli cells and their purified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused deterioration of BFMeT-induced ileal ulcers, while they could not cause the ulcers by themselves without the NSAID. Concentration of LPS and myeloperoxidase activity level were elevated correlatively in the intestinal mucosa of rats treated with LPS and BFMeT. These results suggest that an increase in the number of Gramnegative bacteria and their LPS in the mucosa induces activation of neutrophils together with the help of NSAID action and causes ulcer formation.
Journal Title
The journal of medical investigation : JMI
ISSN
13431420
NCID
AA11166929
Volume
51
Issue
1-2
Start Page
43
End Page
51
Sort Key
43
Published Date
2004-02
EDB ID
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences