ID 111122
Author
Kinoshita, Hiroyuki Aichi Medical University|Tokushima University
Akahori, Takahiko Aichi Medical University
Nakamura, Emi Aichi Medical University
Okawa, Hazuki Aichi Medical University
Fujiwara, Yoshihiro Aichi Medical University
Keywords
Forearm blood flow
near-infrared spectroscopy
regional saturation of oxygen
tissue oxygenation index
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Whether the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology correctly detects the changes in oxygenation related to ischemia and reperfusion of organs and tissues other than brain remains unclear. The present study examined how different tissue oxygenation parameters derived from NIRS reflect the changes in the forearm blood flow (FBF) according to the brief ischemia and the subsequent reperfusion, and whether values of these parameters move in parallel with the medial and lateral sides of FBF. Thirteen volunteers underwent the prospective observational study. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI), regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2), skin tissue oxygenation (StO2), and FBF values were evaluated in the forearm. Medial rSO2 values at 1 to 3 minutes after the termination of brief ischemia were higher than lateral rSO2 and respective TOI values. FBF and StO2 values quickly increased according to the cessation of brief ischemia, whereas the medial and lateral values did not differ during and after the brief ischemia. TOI and StO2, but not rSO2, reflected changes in FBF of both medial and lateral sides simultaneously in response to the reperfusion after brief ischemia. Themuscle tissue oxygenation during reperfusion favors the use of TOI and StO2, but not rSO2, as the surrogate parameter.
Journal Title
The Journal of Medical Investigation
ISSN
13496867
13431420
NCID
AA11166929
AA12022913
Publisher
Faculty of Medicine Tokushima University
Volume
64
Issue
3-4
Start Page
228
End Page
232
Sort Key
228
Published Date
2017-08
EDB ID
DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences
Oral Sciences