ID 112074
Title Alternative
The effects of caffeine on the human Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP), visual evoked potential (VEP) and EEG
Author
Yamanishi, Kazunari The University of Tokushima
Okura, Masao The University of Tokushima
Ikuta, Takumi The University of Tokushima
Edagawa, Koji The University of Tokushima
Okada, Ken The University of Tokushima
Okabe, Hiromichi The University of Tokushima
Keywords
somatosensory evoked potential
visual evoked potential
EEG
double-blind cross-over design
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
The effects of caffeine on central nervous system were investigated with SEP and VEP (EPs). The subjects were 25 healthy male volunteers aged 24-44 with a mean caffeine consumption of 251.4 mg/day, and were divided into the light and heavy consumer groups according to DSM-IV criteria for caffeine intoxication. They were given 3 mg/kg of body weight of caffeine or placebo in a double-blind cross-over design. EEGs containing SEPs evoked by electric stimuli to the right median nerve and VEPs by flash stimuli were recorded before, 30, 60, 90 minutes after dosing. The consecutive changes in EPs and EEG power% were studied and the following results were obtained.
1. Overall subjects had few components with significant changes in latencies and amplitudes of SEP and VEP after administration of caffeine.
2. EEGs recorded together with EPs showed a significant increase in α1 power% and a significant decrease in δ, θ and β2 power%.
3. There were also no significant differences in EPs measures and EEGs between the light and heavy consumer groups, except for EEG power% of VEP with the heavy costumer group showing an earlier appearance of changes.
In conclusion, 3 mg/kg of body weight of caffeine administered in the present study did not effect on SEP and VEP as well as EEGs.
Journal Title
Shikoku Acta Medica
ISSN
00373699
NCID
AN00102041
Publisher
徳島医学会
Volume
54
Issue
2
Start Page
173
End Page
184
Sort Key
173
Published Date
1998-04-25
FullText File
language
jpn
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Health Service and Counseling Center