ID 112382
Author
Koyama, Satoshi Tottori University
Matsunaga, Shinji Tottori University|Osaka City University
Maekawa, Yoichi Gifu University
Kitano, Hiroya Tottori University
Takeuchi, Hiromi Tottori University
Tomita, Shuhei Tottori University|Osaka City University
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Blood vessels are important tissue structures that deliver oxygen and nutrition. In tumour tissue, abnormal blood vessels, which are hyperpermeable and immature, are often formed; these tissues also have irregular vascularisation and intravasation. This situation leads to hypoperfusion in tumour tissue along with low oxygen and nutrition depletion; this is also called the tumour microenvironment and is characterised by hypoxia, depleted nutrition, low pH and high interstitial pressure. This environment induces resistance to anticancer drugs, which causes an increase in anticancer drug doses, leading to increased side effects. We hypothesised that normalised tumour blood vessels would improve tumour tissue perfusion, resupply nutrition and re-oxygenate the tumour tissue. Chemotherapy would then be more effective and cause a decrease in anticancer drug doses. Here we report a neovascularisation-inducing drug that improved tumour vascular abnormalities, such as low blood flow, blood leakage and abnormal vessel structure. These results could lead to not only an increased chemo-sensitivity and tissue-drug distribution but also an up-regulated efficiency for cancer chemotherapy. This suggests that tumour blood vessel normalisation therapy accompanied by angiogenesis may be a novel strategy for cancer therapy.
Journal Title
Scientific Reports
ISSN
20452322
Publisher
Springer Nature
Volume
7
Start Page
45621
Published Date
2017-03-31
Remark
Supplemental Information : srep_7_45621_s1.pdf
Rights
© The Author(s) 2017
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
EDB ID
DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
University Hospital