number of access : ?
number of downloads : ?
ID 114183
Author
Utami, Trianna W. The University of Tokushima
Hagita, Hiroko The University of Tokushima
Yanuaryska, Ryna Dwi The University of Tokushima
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Ameloblasts produce enamel matrix proteins such as amelogenin, ameloblastin, and amelotin during tooth development. The molecular mechanisms of ameloblast differentiation (amelogenesis) are currently not well understood. SP6 is a transcription factor of the Sp/KLF family that was recently found to regulate cell proliferation in a cell-type-specific manner. Sp6-deficient mice demonstrate characteristic tooth anomalies such as delayed eruption of the incisors and supernumerary teeth with disorganized amelogenesis.However, it remains unclear how Sp6 controls amelogenesis. In this study, we used SP6 high producer cells to identify SP6 target genes. Based on the observations that long-term culture of SP6 high producer cells reduced SP6 protein expression but not Sp6 mRNA expression, we found that SP6 is short lived and specifically degraded through a proteasome pathway. We established an in vitro inducible SP6 expression system coupled with siRNA knockdown and found a possible linkage between SP6 and amelogenesis through the regulation of amelotin and Rock1 gene expression by microarray analysis. Our findings suggest that the regulation of SP6 protein stability is one of the crucial steps in amelogenesis.
Journal Title
Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
ISSN
11107243
NCID
AA11698349
Publisher
Hindawi
Volume
2011
Start Page
320987
Published Date
2011-10-20
Rights
© 2011 TriannaW. Utami et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
EDB ID
DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Oral Sciences