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ID 114602
Author
Aoyama, Bun Kochi Medical School
Kawano, Takashi Kochi Medical School
Iwata, Hideki Kochi Medical School
Nishigaki, Atsushi Kochi Medical School
Yamanaka, Daiki Kochi Medical School
Tateiwa, Hiroki Kochi Medical School
Shigematsu-Locatelli, Marie Kochi Medical School
Locatelli, Fabricio M. Kochi Medical School
Yokoyama, Masataka Kochi Medical School
Keywords
Neurosteroid
Allopregnanolone
Aging
Exercise
Acute pain
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
The beneficial effects of physical activity for pain are denominated exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). Here, we examined the age-related change and potential role of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (ALLO) on EIH in rats. Adult and aged rats were randomly divided into one of three groups; non-exercise control, Low-exercise, and High-exercise. The animals in the Low- and High-exercise groups were subjected to a 10-minute treadmill workout at 40% and 80% maximum oxygen intake intensity, respectively. In the Low-exercise groups, a significant EIH response was observed in aged but not in adult rats. The pre-treatment with ALLO synthesis inhibitor finasteride, but not opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone, inhibited the Low-exercise induced EIH response in aged rats. Furthermore, the Low-exercise increased brain ALLO levels in aged animals compared with controls, which was correlated with the mechanical pain sensitivity. On the other hand, High-exercise could induce EIH response in both adult and aged animals, but it was more effective in adult rats. The pre-treatment with naloxone, but not finasteride, reduced the EIH observed after High-exercise in both adult and aged rats. Our findings demonstrated that effective EIH can be achieved even by mild-intensity exercise in aged animals via an increase of the brain ALLO levels.
Journal Title
Journal of Pharmacological Sciences
ISSN
13478613
Publisher
Elsevier|Japanese Pharmacological Society
Volume
139
Issue
2
Start Page
77
End Page
83
Published Date
2018-11-30
Rights
This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
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DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
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departments
Oral Sciences