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ID 114760
Author
Fukuya, Akira Tokushima University
Kagemoto, Kaizo Tokushima University
Okada, Yasuyuki Tokushima University
Adachi, Yuka Shikoku Central Hospital
Kurihara, Takeshi Shikoku Central Hospital
Nii, Toru Shikoku Central Hospital
Tanaka, Hironori Tokushima University
Nakasono, Masahiko Tsurugi Municipal Handa Hospital
Keywords
Esophagogastroduodenoscopy
Vital signs
Heart rate variability
Distraction
Subjective and objective assessment
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Background: Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) provides an indispensable and unambiguous inspection allowing the discovery upper gastrointestinal lesions. However, many patients are anxious about undergoing EGD. Few studies have investigated the influence on patients’ vital signs and tolerance during EGD using subjective and objective assessments. This study was a prospective randomized controlled study that investigated the influence of audio and visual distraction on EGD.
Methods: We randomly divided 289 subjects who underwent EGD into 4 groups (control group, audio group, visual group, combination group) and examined their vital signs, heart rate variability (HRV), psychological items, and acceptance of distraction.
Results: Pulse rate (PR) at post-distraction and post-EGD in the 3 distraction groups were significantly lower than those of control group (p< 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). Blood pressure (BP) during and post-EGD was significantly higher than that at pre-EGD in control group (p < 0.05), but no significant elevation of BP was observed during the latter half of EGD and post-EGD in the 3 distraction groups. BP at post-distraction improved significantly compared to pre-distraction in the 3 distraction groups (p < 0.05). There was a significant difference in the low-frequency (LF) power/ high-frequency (HF) power at post-distraction and post-EGD among the 4 groups (p< 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). The LF power/HF power at post-distraction and post-EGD in the 3 distraction groups was significantly lower than that in control group (p < 0.05). Several items of profile of mood states (POMS) and the impression of EGD at post-distraction improved significantly compared to those at pre-distraction among the 3 distraction groups (p < 0.05). Visual analog scale (VAS) of willingness for the next use of distraction in the 3 distraction groups was excellent because VAS was more than 70.
Conclusions: Distractions effectively improved psychological factors, vital signs and some of HRV at pre and post-EGD. Distractions may suppress BP elevation during the latter half of EGD and lead to stability of HRV on EGD.
Journal Title
BMC Gastroenterology
ISSN
1471230X
NCID
AA12034934
Publisher
Springer Nature|BioMed Central
Volume
20
Start Page
122
Published Date
2020-04-21
Rights
© The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
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language
eng
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departments
Medical Sciences
University Hospital