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ID 115496
Author
Katsumoto, Yusuke Tokushima University
Keywords
Cellulose
nanofiber
blender
parenchyma cell
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Cellulose nanofiber is an environmentally friendly reinforcing phase extractable from plants, with potential application in composites. Due to the cell wall structure differences, plant parenchyma cells might be easier to nanofibrillate than sclerenchyma cells of wood pulp fibers, resulting in lower extraction costs. This study assessed the extraction of nanofibers from residues like corn husk, banana peel, cabbage leaf, and taro leaf using a kitchen blender. Fibrillation was evaluated based on the strength of paper-like sheets produced from the nanofibers. Corn husk was nanofibrillated by the shortest blending time among the sources considered, and delivered the highest sheet strength. The blending time needed was significantly shorter than that needed to fibrillate hardwood pulp fibers.
Journal Title
Modern Physics Letters B
ISSN
17936640
02179849
NCID
AA10672190
Publisher
World Scientific Publishing
Volume
33
Issue
14n15
Start Page
1940012
Published Date
2019-04-12
Rights
Electronic version of an article published as Modern Physics Letters B, Vol. 33, No. 14n15, 2019, 1940012, 10.1142/S0217984919400128 © World Scientific Publishing Company https://www.worldscientific.com/worldscinet/mplb
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DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Author
departments
Science and Technology