number of access : ?
number of downloads : ?
ID 115652
Author
Otsuka, Ikuo Kobe University|RIKEN
Akiyama, Masato RIKEN|Kyushu University
Shirakawa, Osamu Kindai University
Okazaki, Satoshi Kobe University
Momozawa, Yukihide RIKEN
Kamatani, Yoichiro RIKEN|The University of Tokyo
Izumi, Takeshi Health Sciences University of Hokkaido
Takahashi, Motonori Kobe University
Boku, Shuken Kobe University
Sora, Ichiro Kobe University
Yamamoto, Ken Kurume University
Ueno, Yasuhiro Kobe University
Toda, Tatsushi University of Tokyo
Kubo, Michiaki RIKEN
Hishimoto, Akitoyo Kobe University
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Suicide is a significant public health problem worldwide, and several Asian countries including Japan have relatively high suicide rates on a world scale. Twin, family, and adoption studies have suggested high heritability for suicide, but genetics lags behind due to difficulty in obtaining samples from individuals who died by suicide, especially in non-European populations. In this study, we carried out genome-wide association studies combining two independent datasets totaling 746 suicides and 14,049 non-suicide controls in the Japanese population. Although we identified no genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrated significant SNP-based heritability (35–48%; P < 0.001) for completed suicide by genomic restricted maximum-likelihood analysis and a shared genetic risk between two datasets (P best = 2.7 × 10−13) by polygenic risk score analysis. This study is the first genome-wide association study for suicidal behavior in an East Asian population, and our results provided the evidence of polygenic architecture underlying completed suicide.
Journal Title
Neuropsychopharmacology
ISSN
0893133X
1740634X
NCID
AA10761483
Publisher
American College of Neuropsychopharmacology|Springer Nature
Volume
44
Issue
12
Start Page
2119
End Page
2124
Published Date
2019-09-02
Rights
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
EDB ID
DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Medical Sciences