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ID 116293
Author
Okada, Tomonari National Institute for Land and Infrastructure Management
Mito, Yugo Fukken
Akiyama, Yoshihiro B. National Institute for Land and Infrastructure Management
Tokunaga, Kanae Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Sugino, Hiroaki The University of Tokyo
Kubo, Takahiro National Institute for Environmental Studies
Endo, Toru Osaka City University
Otani, Sosuke Osaka Prefecture University College of Technology
Yamochi, Susumu Osaka City University
Kusakabe, Takayuki Research Institute of Environment, Agriculture and Fisheries, Osaka Prefecture
Otsuka, Koji Osaka Prefecture University
Shigematsu, Takaaki Osaka City University
Kuwae, Tomohiro Port and Airport Research Institute
Keywords
Green infrastructure
port structure
tidal flat
restoration
ecosystem services
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Green port structures (i.e. green infrastructure in ports and harbors) featuring habitats for marine organisms have been promoted in Japan as part of a comprehensive policy to reduce the environmental impact of ports and carry out habitat conservation, restoration, and creation. In this study, we evaluated the ecosystem services provided by green port structures in two highly urbanized bays (Tokyo Bay and Osaka Bay) in Japan. Our results show that the provision of some ecosystem services can be limited by circumstances particular to ports and other areas with restricted access. In the case of green port structures that have strong usage restrictions, for example, cultural services can only be provided if relevant authorities are prepared to conduct public events while ensuring participant safety. On the other hand, green port structures with weak usage restrictions are often equipped with incidental facilities such as parking lots and restrooms; these facilities can enhance the provision of cultural services (e.g. recreation and environmental education). Green port structures in highly urbanized bays often have usage restrictions, but their proximity to large populations means that they can potentially provide numerous ecosystem services. However, our study shows that appropriate management goals, such as protecting species and ensuring healthy habitats, are needed to maintain the value of these services in highly urbanized and eutrophic bays.
Journal Title
Coastal Engineering Journal
ISSN
21664250
17936292
NCID
AA11274987
Publisher
Informa UK|Taylor & Francis Group
Volume
63
Issue
3
Start Page
310
End Page
322
Published Date
2021-04-28
Rights
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
EDB ID
DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
Research Center for Management of Disaster and Environment