ID 25690
Author
Gotohda, Takako Department of Legal Medicine, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Kubo, Shin-ichi Department of Legal Medicine, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Kitamura, Osamu Department of Legal Medicine, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Tokunaga, Itsuo Department of Legal Medicine, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Eguchi, Akiko Department of Legal Medicine, The University of Tokushima School of Medicine
Orihara, Yoshiyuki Department of Legal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
Tsuda, Ryouichi Department of Legal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
Ikematsu, Kazuya Department of Legal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
Nakasono, Ichiro Department of Legal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine
Keywords
neuropathology
hypoglossal nucleus
asphyxia
neuronal damage
immunohistochemistry
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
The brain stem hypoglossal nucleus (HN) is the center of nerves innervating the upper respiratory tract and is related to control of mastication, deglutition, speech and respiration. To elucidate the relationship between asphyxia and the HN, we investigated the change of hypoglossal neurons in cases of hanging, strangulation, smothering, choking, drowning and respiratory failure. Using immunohistochemical techniques, we observed the brain stem HN with antibodies against microtubule-associated protein2(MAP2), muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), c-fos gene product (c-Fos) and 72kD heat-shock protein (HSP70). MAP2, a cytoskeletal protein of the neuron, is a marker of neuronal damage. Muscarinic AChR was used as a marker of neuronal membrane and ACh signaling. We employed both HSP70 and c-Fos as markers of stress- or damage-related events. We measured the percentage of immunopositive neurons in total neurons of HN. Drowning produced higher expression of HSP70 and c-Fos than other causes of asphyxia, suggesting that drowning induces more severe damage in HN neurons. Furthermore, it was suspected that neuronal changes in drowning might relate to functions of the HN. These observations indicate that immunohistochemical examination of the brain stem HN could provide useful information for determining the cause of asphyxia.
Journal Title
The journal of medical investigation : JMI
ISSN
13431420
NCID
AA11166929
Volume
47
Issue
1-2
Start Page
76
End Page
79
Sort Key
76
Published Date
2000
Remark
EDB ID
FullText File
language
eng