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ID 116476
Author
Miyazaki, Katsuki Tokushima University
Takehara, Yukako Tokushima University
Keywords
artificial pancreas
complications
glycemic control
lymphocyte
pancreatectomy
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Aim: Pancreatectomy causes both hyperglycemia, secondary to surgical stress, and pancreatic diabetes, which leads to difficult-to-control postoperative blood glucose levels. We investigated whether using an artificial pancreas perioperatively to provide appropriate blood glucose control could reduce postoperative complications following pancreatectomy.
Methods: We retrospectively enrolled 52 patients who underwent pancreatectomy at Tokushima University Hospital from 2015 to 2019. The most recent 26/52 patients received perioperative blood glucose control using an artificial pancreas. Postoperative blood glucose control with manual insulin injections based on a sliding scale was performed in the earlier 26 patients (controls). We compared surgical outcomes between the artificial pancreas group and the control group.
Results: There was no significant difference in patients' white blood cell or neutrophil counts, prognostic nutritional index, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and C-reactive protein-to-albumin ratio on postoperative day 1; however, lymphocyte counts were higher in the artificial pancreas group. The number of serious complications of Clavien-Dindo grade >IIIa was significantly lower in the artificial pancreas group (P < .05).
Conclusions: Using an artificial pancreas for perioperative blood glucose control in patients undergoing pancreatectomy decreased the number of serious complications through proper management of blood glucose levels without hypoglycemia, and may influence peripheral lymphocytes.
Journal Title
Annals of Gastroenterological Surgery
ISSN
24750328
Publisher
The Japanese Society of Gastroenterological Surgery|Wiley
Volume
4
Issue
5
Start Page
591
End Page
596
Published Date
2020-07-18
Rights
This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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DOI (Published Version)
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language
eng
TextVersion
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departments
University Hospital
Medical Sciences