number of access : ?
number of downloads : ?
ID 116223
Title Alternative
SWS of Leiomyoma with Red Degeneration
Author
Matsuzaki, Kenji Tokushima Bunri University KAKEN Search Researchers
Keywords
leiomyoma
red degeneration
susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance sequence
uterus
uterine sarcoma
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Purpose: Red degeneration of uterine leiomyoma (RDL) is a hemorrhagic infarction caused by peripheral venous thrombosis. The peripheral high-intensity rim on T1-weighted MRI is characteristic for RDL; however, it may not be observed at all the phases of RDL. Susceptibility-weighted MR sequences (SWS) have exquisite sensitivity to blood products, and we hypothesized that the low-intensity rim due to the T2* shortening effects of blood products may be more clearly demonstrated on SWS. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of SWS for the diagnosis of RDL.
Methods: Surgically proven 15 RDL, which showed suggestive MRI findings (high-intensity rim or entirely high signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging) were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was qualitatively evaluated for the presence of high-intensity rim around a mass on fat-saturated T1-weighted images, and low-intensity rim on T2-weighted images and on SWS (susceptibility-weighted imaging [SWI] or T2-star-weighted angiography [SWAN]).
Results: The high-intensity rim on T1-weighted images, low-intensity rim on T2-weighted images and on SWS were observed in 47%, 47%, and 100% of RDL, respectively. The other 53% of lesions showed entirely high signal intensity on T1-weighted images. Pathological examination revealed coagulative necrosis in all 15 lesions.
Conclusion: SWS may be helpful for the diagnosis of RDL by revealing characteristic peripheral low-intensity rim.
Journal Title
Magnetic Resonance in Medical Sciences
ISSN
18802206
13473182
NCID
AA11648770
Publisher
Japanese Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume
18
Issue
2
Start Page
158
End Page
162
Published Date
2018-10-01
Rights
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives International License(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
EDB ID
DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
Publisher
departments
University Hospital
Medical Sciences