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ID 113933
Author
Tajima, Atsushi Tokushima University|Kanazawa University KAKEN Search Researchers
Sato, Takehiro Kanazawa University
Nozawa, Shiari St. Marianna University School of Medicine
Yoshiike, Miki St. Marianna University School of Medicine
Iwamoto, Teruaki St. Marianna University School of Medicine|International University of Health and Welfare Hospital
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Background
The decrease in sperm motility has a potent influence on fertilisation. Sperm motility, represented as the percentage of motile sperm in ejaculated sperms, is influenced by lifestyle habits or environmental factors and by inherited factors. However, genetic factors contributing to individual differences in sperm motility remain unclear. To identify genetic factors that influence human sperm motility, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of sperm motility.
Methods
A two-stage GWAS was conducted using 811 Japanese men in a discovery stage, followed by a replication study using an additional 779 Japanese men.
Results
In the two-staged GWAS, a single nucleotide polymorphism rs3791686 in the intron of gene for erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 4 (ERBB4) on chromosome 2q34 was identified as a novel locus for sperm motility, as evident from the discovery and replication results using meta-analysis (β=−4.01, combined P=5.40×10−9).
Conclusions
Together with the previous evidence that Sertoli cell-specific Erbb4-knockout mice display an impaired ability to produce motile sperm, this finding provides the first genetic evidence for further investigation of the genome-wide significant association at the ERBB4 locus in larger studies across diverse human populations.
Journal Title
Journal of Medical Genetics
ISSN
00222593
14686244
NCID
AA00702295
Publisher
British Medical Association
Volume
55
Issue
6
Start Page
415
End Page
421
Published Date
2018-02-16
Rights
This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
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language
eng
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departments
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Medical Sciences