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ID 115715
Author
Takeda, Tomoya Tokushima University
Hamatani, Sayo Chiba University
Matsuura, Kanae Tokushima University
Keywords
Neurocognition
Social cognition
Jumping to conclusion
Schizophrenia
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
The “jumping to conclusion” (JTC) bias is related to the formation and maintenance of delusions. Higher JTC bias can be based on both neurocognitive dysfunction and social cognitive dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between JTC bias, neurocognition, and social cognition in patients with schizophrenia.
A total of 22 patients with schizophrenia and 21 controls participated in this study. Neurocognition and social cognition were assessed using the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) and Social Cognition Screening Questionnaire (SCSQ), respectively. The JTC bias and the decision confidence were assessed using the beads task.
The patients were classified into the JTC group (with higher JTC bias; n = 10) and JTC-non group (n = 12). The JTC group scored significantly lower on verbal memory, working memory, and motor speed sub-scores of BACS than the JTC-non group. No difference in social cognition was observed between the two groups. The decision confidence was predicted by metacognition, which is an SCSQ sub-score. Similarly to the patients, the controls were classified into the JTC group (higher JTC bias; n = 9) and the JTC-non group (n = 12). There were no significant differences in neurocognition and social cognition between the control JTC and JTC-non groups.
The present results indicated that JTC bias is related to neurocognition and decision confidence is related to social cognition in patients with schizophrenia. These findings may bridge the gaps between psychotic symptom and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia.
Journal Title
Schizophrenia Research: Cognition
ISSN
22150013
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
12
Start Page
50
End Page
55
Published Date
2018-05-05
Rights
This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
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DOI (Published Version)
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language
eng
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departments
University Hospital
Medical Sciences