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ID 114544
Author
Hirata, Yukina Tokushima University
Salim, Hotimah Masdan Tokushima University
Maimaituxun, Gulinu Tokushima University
Nishio, Susumu Tokushima University
Takagawa, Yuriko Tokushima University
Hama, Saori Tokushima University
Aihara, Ken‑ichi Tokushima University
Shimabukuro, Michio Tokushima University|Fukushima Medical University KAKEN Search Researchers
Keywords
Epicardial adipose tissue
SGLT2 inhibitors
Echocardiography
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Background: It is unknown whether canagliflozin, a selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, reduces epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) thickness, which is associated with insulin resistance and is a risk factor for coronary artery disease.
Methods and results: We administered 100 mg of canagliflozin for 6 months to 13 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We evaluated glycemic control, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) area and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) area, and skeletal muscle mass by using impedance methods, and EAT thickness by using echocardiography. Canagliflozin treatment for 6 months decreased hemoglobin A1c level from 7.1 ± 0.5% to 6.7 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05) and decreased EAT thickness from 9.3 ± 2.5 to 7.3 ± 2.0 mm (P < 0.001), along with a trend of decreasing VAT and SAT area. No association was found between any of these changes.
Conclusion: Canagliflozin reduced EAT thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of its effect on lowering blood glucose, suggesting that canagliflozin may have an effect in preventing cardiovascular events in these patients (UMIN000021327).
Journal Title
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
ISSN
17585996
Publisher
BioMed Central|Springer Nature
Volume
9
Start Page
78
Published Date
2017-10-04
Rights
© The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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language
eng
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departments
Medical Sciences
University Hospital