ID 112429
Author
Inaba, Hiroshi Tottori University
Uemura, Akihito Tottori University
Morishita, Kazushi Tottori University
Kohiki, Taiki Tokushima University
Matsuura, Kazunori Tottori University
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Light-driven nano/micromotors are attracting much attention, not only as molecular devices but also as components of bioinspired robots. In nature, several pathogens such as Listeria use actin polymerisation machinery for their propulsion. Despite the development of various motors, it remains challenging to mimic natural systems to create artificial motors propelled by fibre formation. Herein, we report the propulsion of giant liposomes driven by light-induced peptide nanofibre growth on their surface. Peptide-DNA conjugates connected by a photocleavage unit were asymmetrically introduced onto phase-separated giant liposomes. Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation cleaved the conjugates and released peptide units, which self-assembled into nanofibres, driving the translational movement of the liposomes. The velocity of the liposomes reflected the rates of the photocleavage reaction and subsequent fibre formation of the peptide-DNA conjugates. These results showed that chemical design of the light-induced peptide nanofibre formation is a useful approach to fabricating bioinspired motors with controllable motility.
Journal Title
Scientific Reports
ISSN
20452322
Publisher
Springer Nature
Volume
8
Start Page
6243
Published Date
2018-04-19
Remark
Supplementary Information : srep_8_6243_s1.docx
Supplementary Video : srep_8_6243_s2.mp4
Rights
© The Author(s) 2018
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
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DOI (Published Version)
URL ( Publisher's Version )
FullText File
language
eng
TextVersion
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departments
Pharmaceutical Sciences