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ID 113980
Author
Hashimoto, Muneaki National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Yatsushiro, Shouki National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Yamamura, Shohei National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Tanaka, Masato National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Sakamoto, Hirokazu National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology|The University of Tokyo
Ido, Yusuke National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory
Kajimoto, Kazuaki National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Kataoka, Masatoshi National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
Keywords
Malaria
Diagnosis
Automation
Hydrophilic treatment
Giemsa-staining
Content Type
Journal Article
Description
Background: Malaria is a red blood cell (RBC) infection caused by Plasmodium parasites. To determine RBC infection rate, which is essential for malaria study and diagnosis, microscopic evaluation of Giemsa-stained thin blood smears on glass slides (‘Giemsa microscopy’) has been performed as the accepted gold standard for over 100 years. However, only a small area of the blood smear provides a monolayer of RBCs suitable for determination of infection rate, which is one of the major reasons for the low parasite detection rate by Giemsa microscopy. In addition, because Giemsa microscopy is exacting and time-consuming, automated counting of infection rates is highly desirable.
Results: A method that allows for microscopic examination of Giemsa-stained cells spread in a monolayer on almost the whole surface of hydrophilic-treated cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) plates was established. Because wide-range Giemsa microscopy can be performed on a hydrophilic-treated plate, the method may enable more reliable diagnosis of malaria in patients with low parasitaemia burden. Furthermore, the number of RBCs and parasites stained with a fluorescent nuclear staining dye could be counted automatically with a software tool, without Giemsa staining. As a result, researchers studying malaria may calculate the infection rate easily, rapidly, and accurately even in low parasitaemia.
Conclusion: Because the running cost of these methods is very low and they do not involve complicated techniques, the use of hydrophilic COC plates may contribute to improved and more accurate diagnosis and research of malaria.
Journal Title
Malaria Journal
ISSN
14752875
Publisher
BioMed Central|Springer Nature
Volume
16
Start Page
321
Published Date
2017-08-08
Rights
© The Author(s) 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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DOI (Published Version)
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language
eng
TextVersion
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departments
Institute of Advanced Medical Sciences
University Hospital
Oral Sciences