ID 74418
Title Transcription
ジヘイセイ ショウガイ ガ アル コドモ ノ キョウドウ チュウイ コウドウ ニ エイキョウ スル エンジョシャ ノ コウドウ : ゲンゴテキ エンジョ ト ヒゲンゴテキ エンジョ ノ ヒカク
Title Alternative
The influence of supporter behavior in the autistic children 's joint attention behavior : comparing verbel communication support and non-verbel communication support
Author
Sugiki, Rika Nonprofit Organization Institute of child development study Kirin
Mori, Yoko Faculty of Integrated Arts and Science, The University of Tokushima
Yamamoto, Mayumi Faculty of Integrated Arts and Science, The University of Tokushima Tokushima University Educator and Researcher Directory KAKEN Search Researchers
Keywords
Autism
Joint Attention
Scaffolding
Verbal communication
Non-verbal communication
Content Type
Departmental Bulletin Paper
Description
It is said that the infantile autism have a disability of joint attention in social
behavior. This study is aimed at comparing the effectiveness of verbal communication
support and non-verbal communication support,which raises joint attention behavior
of infantile autism. In the investigation we use alternating treatment design.
Subjects were two infants. Both were diagnosed autism. Based on Scaffolding,
support behavior was divided into verbal communication support and non-verbal
communication support. When they played at housekeeping,we analyzed which
support produced a greater number of joint attention behavior.
The result showed that in one of them the verbal communication support was
more effective than non-verbalcommunication support in joint attention producing. It
suggests that he developed the ability of verbal sensitivity. Another result was not
statistically significant as both subjects,when they had verbal communication support,
showed a trend of more joint attention behavior as the supporter's behavior was
lesser. There was a discussion about this result.
Journal Title
徳島大学総合科学部人間科学研究
ISSN
09199810
NCID
AN1043724X
Volume
16
Start Page
49
End Page
61
Sort Key
49
Published Date
2008
FullText File
departments
Integrated Arts and Sciences